Frozen Kale?

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Kale has been a popular vegetable for years, and with good reason: It’s loaded with nutrients, including vitamins A and C, calcium, iron, fiber, potassium, magnesium, zinc, and omega-3 fatty acids.

But when it comes to freezing, kale turns out to be quite the disappointment.

frozen kale

What is the nutritional value of frozen kale?

According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, kale contains almost 40% of your daily recommended intake of vitamin K, which is important for blood clotting.

It also provides an impressive amount of vitamin A (13%), vitamin C (11%), folate (9%), manganese (8%), copper (6%), and vitamin B1 (5%).

How long can you keep frozen kale before it goes bad?

The USDA recommends storing kale in the freezer for six months or longer.

That means you should be able to get through a full year without having to throw away a bunch of kale!

When you buy your kale, look for bunches that have firm leaves and feel heavy for their size.

This is a sign that they’re not going to go bad quickly.

Also pay attention to the leaf color: If the leaves are dark green, that means they contain chlorophyll.

What are some recipes that use frozen kale?

You can find tons of delicious ways to enjoy frozen kale.

Try this recipe for kale chips or this one for a quick and easy breakfast dish.

How do you cook frozen kale?

If you want to make a side dish out of your frozen kale, try sautéing it in olive oil over medium heat for about 5 minutes.

Then add salt and pepper to taste, followed by garlic, onion, and mushrooms.

Cook until everything is tender, then remove from heat and set aside.

What are some of the benefits of eating frozen kale?

Just like other types of vegetables, frozen kale offers many health benefits, including weight loss, improved heart health, and increased energy levels.

Some studies even suggest that frozen kale may help prevent cancer and lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

Are there any drawbacks to eating frozen kale?

While frozen kale is generally safe to eat, it does contain a high level of oxalic acid, so those who are sensitive to oxalates should probably avoid it.

Oxalate foods include spinach, rhubarb, parsley, and most beans.

Oxalate sensitivity is common among people with kidney disease, and those who are lactose intolerant.

However, because of its low oxalate content, frozen kale isn’t likely to cause these issues, especially in healthy individuals.

How does frozen kale compare to fresh kale?

Fresh kale is definitely the better choice, but frozen kale is still a great option if you don’t have access to fresh produce.

Frozen kale is packed with lots of nutrients, and while it won’t have as much flavor as fresh kale, it will still taste pretty darn good.

What is the best way to store frozen kale?

One of the biggest reasons why frozen kale doesn’t work is because it loses all of its nutrients after being exposed to air.

The best way to preserve this nutrient-rich food is to place it on a plate that has been covered in plastic wrap.

You could also put it in a resealable bag, but you shouldn’t leave it in the refrigerator for too long.

How can you tell if frozen kale is bad?

The only way to know for sure if frozen kale is bad is to test it first.

To do this, cut open a small piece of frozen kale and see what happens.

If you notice a bitter taste or smell, that’s a sign that the kale was stored incorrectly.

If it tastes fine, then you’re good to go.

Frozen Kale? 1

Can you freeze kale more than once?

Yes, you can freeze kale multiple times, but you should always follow the same storage guidelines as described above.

For example, the second time around, you might need to thaw it in the fridge overnight instead of cooking it straight from the freezer.

If you want to freeze kale again, you can do so in portions, such as half a bunch per bag.

How can you tell if frozen kale is bad?

You can tell if frozen kale is bad based on the texture.

If it looks mushy, or if it falls apart easily, then it probably wasn’t properly frozen.

If it’s just a little soft, though, then it’s still okay to eat.

Can you freeze kale more than once?

Yes, you can freeze kale up to five times, but you should always follow the same storage guidelines as described above.

For example, the second time around, you might need to thaw it in the fridge overnight instead of cooking it straight from the freezer.

If you want to freeze kale again, you can do so in portions, such as half a bunch per bag.

How can you tell if frozen kale is bad?

You can tell if frozen kale is bad based on the texture.

If it looks mushy, or if it falls apart easily, then it probably wasn’t properly frozen.

If it’s just a little soft, though, then it’s still okay to eat.

Can you freeze kale more than once?

Yes, you can freeze kale up to five times, but you should always follow the same storage guidelines as described above.

For example, the second time around, you might need to thaw it in the fridge overnight instead of cooking it straight from the freezer.

If you want to freeze kale again, you can do so in portions, such as half a bunch per bag.

Chinese-style kale

Chinese-style kale

With a few straightforward shakes of the correct sauces, you can give an old British favorite an Asian twist.
Prep Time 5 mins
Cook Time 10 mins
Course Side Dish
Cuisine Chinese
Servings 2
Calories 47 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 large garlic clove sliced
  • 200 g kale
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp oyster sauce

Instructions
 

  • First, warm the oil in a sizable frying pan or wok. Next, add the garlic and saute for a few seconds. Add the kale and stir it around in the hot oil and garlic to coat.
  • Add 100 ml of boiling water, cover, and simmer for an additional 7 minutes, or until the kale is wilted and tender.
  • Heat the soy and oyster sauces thoroughly before serving.

Video

Nutrition

Calories: 47kcalCarbohydrates: 6gProtein: 4gFat: 2gSaturated Fat: 0.2gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 0.1gSodium: 802mgPotassium: 378mgFiber: 4gSugar: 1gVitamin A: 9990IUVitamin C: 94mgCalcium: 261mgIron: 2mg
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

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