Make Pumpkin Butter in Slow Cooker

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Don’t you miss that fantastic smell of fall?

I do, and one of the things that always gets me in the mood for sweater weather is the smell of pumpkin spice.

While you could go out and buy a jar of pre-made pumpkin butter, it’s straightforward to make your own at home with just a few ingredients, and it will make your house smell like fall.

Pumpkin butter is a delicious seasonal treat that you can make easily in your slow cooker.

This simple recipe requires just a few ingredients and minimal preparation, making it the perfect last-minute fall dessert or snack.

Here are a few reasons why using a slow cooker is the best way to make pumpkin butter.

First, it allows you to quickly and conveniently cook your ingredients without watching over them constantly, making it ideal for busy schedules.

Additionally, the low heat of a slow cooker helps prevent your pumpkin butter from burning or overcooking, resulting in a smoother, more evenly cooked final product.

Finally, the slow cooker allows your pumpkin butter to develop rich and complex flavors over a more extended period, ensuring that your homemade treat is as delicious as possible.

Whether looking for a fall dessert or snack, you are making pumpkin butter in your slow cooker is the perfect way to get that delicious seasonal flavor.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 2 cups apple juice or cider
  • ½ cup maple syrup or honey
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves

Step By Step Instructions:

You’ll need to gather your ingredients: pumpkin puree, apple juice or cider, brown sugar, cinnamon, and ginger.

You can also add nutmeg or cloves if you like.

A good rule of thumb is a 1:1 ratio of pumpkin puree to apple juice or cider.

1. To make the pumpkin butter, add all ingredients to a slow cooker and stir to combine. Please set it to low heat and let it cook for several hours, stirring occasionally. You should check on the pumpkin butter every hour to ensure it doesn’t burn.

2. Cover and cook for 6-8 hours, or until the mixture thickens and becomes dark brown.

3. Use a spatula or immersion blender to stir the pumpkin butter until smooth and incorporated gently.

4. Serve the pumpkin butter warm or cold, drizzled over biscuits, toast, scones, or ice cream for a delicious fall treat.

Note:

You can store any leftover pumpkin butter in an airtight container in your fridge for a week.

If you want the best flavor, however, it is recommended that you use up your pumpkin butter within 3-4 days.

As you can see, making pumpkin butter in a slow cooker is fast and straightforward.

This delicious recipe will please whether you are looking for a fall treat or an easy snack.

If your pumpkin butter is too thick, add more apple juice or cider until it reaches the desired consistency.

If it is too thin, cook it uncovered for an hour or so to allow some of the liquid to evaporate.

Pumpkin butter can be stored in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

Alternatively, you can freeze it for later use.

How does it improve your health?

Pumpkin butter is delicious, but it also offers several health benefits.

Pumpkin puree is packed with vitamins and minerals, including beta-carotene, potassium, and vitamin C.

Additionally, adding spices like cinnamon and ginger can help improve digestion and circulation.

Here are some benefits of eating pumpkin butter:

Boosts immunity: Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that helps protect your cells from damage. Additionally, it helps boost your immune system, making it easier for your body to fight off infection.

Aids in weight loss: Pumpkin puree is low in calories and high in fiber, making it an excellent food for those trying to lose weight. Fiber helps fill you up and keeps you feeling full longer, preventing overeating.

Helps improve digestion: The fiber in pumpkin puree also helps promote regularity and prevents constipation. Additionally, the spices in pumpkin butter can help improve digestion by stimulating gastric juices.

Reduces inflammation: Pumpkin puree is rich in beta-carotene, an antioxidant that has been shown to reduce inflammation. This can be beneficial for conditions like arthritis or Crohn’s disease.

So, there you have it! Pumpkin butter is delicious, but it also offers several health benefits.

Make some pumpkin butter today if you are looking for an easy and tasty way to enjoy fall flavors.

What are the nutritional benefits?

Pumpkin puree is a good source of fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

It is also low in calories and fat.

Here are the nutritional benefits of pumpkin butter:

High in fiber: Pumpkin puree is rich in fiber, which aids in digestion and prevents constipation. Additionally, fiber helps keep you feeling full longer, which can help prevent overeating.

Rich in beta-carotene: This antioxidant has been shown to reduce inflammation, which can be beneficial for conditions like arthritis and Crohn’s disease. Additionally, it has been linked to lower rates of certain cancers and heart disease.

Good source of vitamins and minerals: Pumpkin puree is a good source of vitamins A, C, and E, as well as potassium and magnesium.

Low in calories: One cup of pumpkin puree contains only about 80 calories. Additionally, it is low in fat and saturated fat.

Nutritional Facts:

Serving size: 100g

  • Calories: 41
  • Sugar: 6.6g
  • Total Fat: 0.4g
  • Total Carbs: 9.5g
  • Sugar: 6.6g
  • Protein: 1.3g
  • Vitamin A: 17% RDA
  • Vitamin C: 20% RDA
  • Iron: 3% RDA
  • Fiber: 3g
  • Potassium: 5% RDA
  • Magnesium: 4% RDA

Pumpkin butter is a healthy and delicious way to enjoy fall flavors.

Its high fiber content can help promote regularity and prevent constipation.

Additionally, the beta-carotene in pumpkin butter can help reduce inflammation.

Pumpkin butter is also a good source of vitamins and minerals, including potassium and magnesium.

How long does fresh pumpkin butter last?

People often wonder how long fresh pumpkin butter will last since it is a reasonably perishable food item.

The good news is that if you store your fresh pumpkin butter properly, it can last anywhere from several months to a year.

To maintain optimal freshness, you should always keep it in the refrigerator and ensure that the lid or seal on the container is airtight.

Additionally, it’s a good idea to write the date that you made the pumpkin butter on the container so you can keep track of how long it’s been stored.

Assuming proper storage, fresh pumpkin butter will usually be safe to eat for 3-4 months.

However, there may be slight changes in flavor or consistency as the pumpkin butter ages.

If you start noticing any spoilage signs, such as an off-smell or visible mold growth, it’s best to discard the pumpkin butter and make a new batch.

Overall, if you take care to store your fresh pumpkin butter properly, it can last for quite some time, and you can enjoy it for weeks or months!

What can I put pumpkin butter on?

Well, the list is virtually endless!

You can put pumpkin butter on bagels, toast, muffins, pancakes, or waffles.

It’s also great for dipping pretzels and veggies in.

If you want to make a sweet dessert with your pumpkin butter, you can spread it over a slice of pound cake.

Pumpkin butter is also delicious when mixed into Greek yogurt, or you could even stir it into a bowl of oatmeal.

Pumpkin butter is a very versatile condiment, so be creative!

How do you get the moisture out of pumpkin puree?

There are a few ways to get the moisture out of pumpkin puree.

One way is to cook the pumpkin puree in a pan over low heat until it thickens and the water evaporates.

Another way is to place the pumpkin puree in a strainer or colander and allow it to sit for several hours until the water has drained out of the puree.

If you are in a hurry, you can also use a microwave to speed up the process.

Place small portions of pumpkin puree on a plate and cook for about 2 minutes until the puree is slightly warm and most of the excess moisture has evaporated.

You can then use this pumpkin puree in your favorite recipes or store it in the refrigerator for later use.

If you’re looking for a recipe that uses pumpkin puree, try a pumpkin bread or muffin recipe to get started.

These are easy to make and perfect for sharing with friends and family during the fall season!

Whether you choose to cook the puree or use it right out of the can, there are many delicious ways to enjoy this healthy and hearty vegetable.

So next time you’re in the mood for something sweet, give pumpkin puree a try!

How do you strain pumpkin puree without a cheesecloth?

If you don’t have a cheesecloth, you can use a paper towel or a coffee filter.

Line a bowl with the filter or paper towel and pour the pumpkin puree into the bowl.

Let it sit for a few minutes, then carefully lift the filter or paper towel out of the bowl, draining the pumpkin puree.

Why is my pumpkin so watery?

Pumpkins are generally full of water, but the amount can vary significantly from one pumpkin to another and even within the same pumpkin.

If your pumpkin seems mainly watery, there are a few possible reasons.

One possibility is that the pumpkin was picked too early.

Pumpkins should be harvested when they are fully ripe, which means the skin will be challenging, and the stem will be dry.

If the pumpkin was picked before it was fully ripe, it will have less flavor and may be watery.

Another possibility is that the pumpkin was damaged after it was picked.

Pumpkins are delicate, and even a tiny bruise can cause them to start leaking water.

If you notice any damage to your pumpkin, try to cut away the affected area before using it.

Finally, some pumpkins tend to be more watery than others.

Some varieties, such as Jack-Be-Little, tend to have more water inside them, so they are often used for decorating rather than cooking.

If your pumpkin is particularly watery, there may not be much you can do about it.

However, it is probably safe to eat if the pumpkin still tastes good.

Just be aware that the watery part may have less flavor than the rest of the pumpkin, and you may need to add some seasoning or spices for extra flavor.

In short, there are a few possible reasons why your pumpkin might be so watery.

If it was picked too early, damaged after picking, or simply prone to watery flesh, you might need to adjust your cooking methods accordingly.

However, if the pumpkin still tastes good, it should be safe to eat.

Remember that the watery part may not have as much flavor as other pumpkin parts.

Make Pumpkin Butter in Slow Cooker

Make Pumpkin Butter in Slow Cooker

Pumpkin butter is a delicious seasonal treat that you can make easily in your slow cooker.
Prep Time 5 mins
Cook Time 6 hrs
Total Time 6 hrs 5 mins
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Servings 2
Calories 377 kcal

Equipment

  • 1 Slow Cooker

Ingredients
  

  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 2 cups apple juice
  • ½ cup maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves

Instructions
 

  • To make the pumpkin butter, add all ingredients to a slow cooker and stir to combine. Please set it to low heat and let it cook for several hours, stirring occasionally. You should check on the pumpkin butter every hour to ensure it doesn’t burn.
  • Cover and cook for 6-8 hours, or until the mixture thickens and becomes dark brown.
  • Use a spatula or immersion blender to stir the pumpkin butter until smooth and incorporated gently.
  • Serve the pumpkin butter warm or cold, drizzled over biscuits, toast, scones, or ice cream for a delicious fall treat.

Nutrition

Calories: 377kcalCarbohydrates: 93gProtein: 2gFat: 1gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 24mgPotassium: 694mgFiber: 5gSugar: 76gVitamin A: 19071IUVitamin C: 7mgCalcium: 151mgIron: 2mg
Keyword Make Pumpkin Butter in Slow Cooker
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