Puff Pastry Vs Pie Crust?

This post may contain affiliate links. I may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. All opinions remain my own.

If you’re looking for a classic dessert that will impress your friends and family, then there are few options as good as a homemade pie.

But if you want to keep things simple, then a store-bought pie shell might be a better option.

But what about those times when you need to whip up a quick dessert, but don’t have time to make a pie?

Well, if you’ve got some puff pastry on hand (or even some frozen) then it’s possible to create an impressive treat in no time at all!

Here we’ll explain the differences between these two classic pastries so you know which one to use when making a pie or tart – and which one is easier to bake.

Pie Crust

What is the difference between puff pastry and pie crust?

These days, they call both pastries “pie crusts,” but they aren’t quite the same thing.

They’re actually two different types of pastry doughs, made from different ingredients.

In short, puff pastry is made with flour, water, and fat.

It’s rolled out into thin sheets, and used for savory dishes like quiches, tarts, croissants, and turnovers.

On the other hand, pie crust is made with flour, water, and fat.

It’s rolled out into a thicker crust, and used for sweet pies, such as fruit pies, custards, and meringue pies.

Which one is more difficult to make?

While pie crust is much easier to make than puff pastry, it takes more effort.

The main reason for this is because puff pastry requires less skill to roll out, while pie crust needs lots of practice to get just right.

The second reason why pie crust is harder to make than puff pastry is because of the type of fat used.

While puff pastry recipes often call for butter, pie crust recipes usually use lard or vegetable oil instead.

This makes it much harder to work with, since lard has a higher melting point than butter, and therefore requires extra care when handling it.

What are the similarities between the two?

The most obvious similarity between puff pastry and pie crust is their thickness.

Both require a thick layer of dough, and both are best served warm from the oven.

How do you make each one?

With pie crust, you start by mixing together flour, sugar, salt, and shortening (or vegetable oil).

You then add eggs and milk to the mixture, and mix until everything comes together.

Once mixed, you roll the dough out thinly, and cut out circles or squares to fit your pie pan.

If you’ve never made pie crust before, then you may also find it helpful to buy a pie crust recipe online.

With puff pastry, you begin by combining flour, salt, sugar, and egg yolks.

Then you whisk in the milk and melted butter, and combine until everything comes together.

Finally, you roll the dough out very thinly, and cut it into shapes that match your pie plate.

Again, if you’ve never made puff pastry before, then you may also find it helpful to buy a puff pastry recipe online.

What is your favorite recipe that uses puff pastry or pie crust?

My favorite pie crust recipe is my mom’s, which is easy to make and delicious.

I always try to make her version whenever she asks me to bring something to a potluck or picnic.

Here’s how to make it:

  • Combine 1 cup flour, 2 teaspoons salt, and ½ teaspoon baking powder in a bowl.
  • Add ¼ cup cold unsalted butter to the dry ingredients and cut it into small pieces with a fork or pastry blender.
  • Mix well to combine all the ingredients, and then add 1¾ cups of ice water gradually, stirring constantly to avoid clumping.
  • Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead it gently until smooth. Wrap in plastic wrap and let rest for 30 minutes.
  • Divide the dough into two equal portions, and roll each portion into a circle about 10 inches in diameter.
  • Move the circles to a parchment-lined cookie sheet, and cover them tightly with plastic wrap. Refrigerate overnight.
  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit (200 degrees Celsius), and remove the plastic wrap.
  • Use a knife to cut each piece of dough into 4 wedges.
  • Bake for 15 minutes, turn the heat down to 350 degrees Fahrenheit (180 degrees Celsius), and cook another 12 minutes.
  • Remove from the oven, brush with egg wash, and sprinkle with powdered sugar.

What are the benefits of using puff pastry over pie crust?

Puff pastry is generally easier to handle than pie crust, since it doesn’t contain any lard or shortening.

As a result, it’s much easier to roll out, and it’s not nearly as hard to cut into shapes.

Puff Pastry Vs Pie Crust? 1

What are the benefits of using pie crust over puff pastry?

When you use puff pastry, you get a thinner crust that’s perfect for serving warm.

If you want to serve your pie cold, however, then you should go with pie crust.

In fact, many people think that the best way to eat puff pastry is cold.

You can also use puff pastry to build a layered dessert, like a cheesecake or brownie cake.

Is one healthier than the other?

Neither is healthier than the other, so it depends on your personal preferences.

However, it’s important to note that puff pastry contains a lot more saturated fats than pie crust does.

So if you want to reduce your intake of saturated fats, then you should stick to pie crust.

Which one do you prefer and why?

I personally love both kinds of pastry, so it really depends on what kind of food I’m making.

When I make a cheese pie, I like to use puff pastry because it’s easier to handle.

And when I make a fruit pie, I like to use pie crust because it’s thicker, and has a richer flavor.

So, if you’re trying to decide between the two, choose whichever one you prefer the most.

Have you ever made either one from scratch?

Yes, I’ve made both from scratch.

I’ve made puff pastry several times, and I’ve made pie crust several times too.

My mom taught me how to make puff pastry when I was in high school, and I learned how to make it again when I started college.

Now that I’m older, I’m definitely able to make it faster and easier, but
I still enjoy making it whenever I can.

And I’m sure you probably already guessed, but I’ve made both from scratch too.

My mom taught me how to make pie crust when I was younger, and I’ve been making it ever since.

Puff Pastry Vs Pie Crust? 2

Pie Crust recipe

These crispy, flaky pies are the perfect snack. They're easy to make and delicious!
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 50 mins
Total Time 1 hr
Course Breakfast, Snack
Cuisine American
Servings 4 people
Calories 216 kcal

Equipment

  • 1 bowl
  • 1 fork or pastry blender
  • plastic wrap
  • 1 oven

Ingredients
  

Instructions
 

  • Combine flour salt, and baking powder in a bowl.
  • Add cold unsalted butter to the dry ingredients and cut it into small pieces with a fork or pastry blender.
  • Mix well to combine all the ingredients, and then add ice water gradually, stirring constantly to avoid clumping.
  • Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead it gently until smooth. Wrap in plastic wrap and let rest for 30 minutes.
  • Divide the dough into two equal portions, and roll each portion into a circle about 10 inches in diameter.
  • Move the circles to a parchment-lined cookie sheet, and cover them tightly with plastic wrap. Refrigerate overnight.
  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit (200 degrees Celsius), and remove the plastic wrap.
  • Use a knife to cut each piece of dough into 4 wedges.
  • Bake for 15 minutes, turn the heat down to 350 degrees Fahrenheit (180 degrees Celsius), and cook another 12 minutes.
  • Remove from the oven, brush with egg wash, and sprinkle with powdered sugar.

Video

Nutrition

Calories: 216kcalCarbohydrates: 24gProtein: 3gFat: 12gSaturated Fat: 7gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 3gTrans Fat: 0.5gCholesterol: 31mgSodium: 1223mgPotassium: 37mgFiber: 1gSugar: 0.1gVitamin A: 355IUCalcium: 41mgIron: 2mg
Keyword Pie Crust
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Leave a Comment

Recipe Rating




Previous

Does Cream Of Tartar Go Bad?

What Is A Shelf Life?

Next